Tub Time

I think we spent more time in our tub last weekend that we ever have in the past (read: we’ve never used our master tub since we moved in), but this is good because it means progress is being made! The tub was actually quite comfy, and we decided a real bath was in order once this renovation is complete.

Two weekends ago we got all our tile cut and installed for the tub back splash and it looks nice. It’s weird that the shower looks much brighter and airier than the tub despite having the same tile, but I think this could be because the tub was not grouted yet so the tiles look more somber and grey. Also, the shower is next to the window so there’s more light over there.

Here’s some picture tiling…first, I’ll show pictures from our epic snow storm two Wednesdays ago, in which it snowed 9″. It was a winter wonderland the next morning, with beautiful blue skies and so much fluffy white snow. We would’ve gotten stuff done on the bathroom, but with 9″ there’s not much we could do since cutting tile requires access to an outdoor space and a garden hose for water.

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Thankfully, in true North Carolina fashion, it was in the 60’s by that weekend so most of the snow melted away and we were able to drag out the tile saw and get the tiles cut:

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We planned for a short back splash, just 1 row of 12×24 tiles and 1 row of bullnose. This was about the same height as the previous little white tiles that were there.

We got the big tiles in on Saturday as well as the bullnose pieces that didn’t require cutting/measuring, and then cut and installed the remaining bullnose on Sunday. Overall, this job was much easier than the shower because we didn’t use cement board backing or do any excessive water proofing because unlike showers, where water is supposed to hit and flow down the walls every day, tub walls (in theory, although I suppose people with young children may beg to differ) only get an occasional splash, and mortar and grout are more than enough to waterproof this.

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This past weekend I grouted and worked on smoothing the drywall patching around the tile.

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Nik also made wonderful progress with the threshold into the bathroom. He impressed me, as per usual, by crafting a threshold out of a 1×4″ piece of red oak. He routed out the bottom to allow space for the carpet to be pinned under the threshold, and another part to go around the slightly uneven cement board under the tile at the other end. Then he used the circular saw on a tilt to make the top a gradual slope from the height of the tile to the height of the carpet. He used the jig saw to have it cut perfectly at the sides to fit flush against the door frame.  In the end, this custom threshold fits like a glove. Oh, and it was only $9 of wood! DIY win. Last weekend I stained the threshold with an opaque gray deck stain – it’s a little weird looking, but we couldn’t think of any other color/stain that would’ve matched more so it is what it is. I forgot to take a picture, so I’ll include one next time.

The planks also got an extra coat of sealer but we didn’t have enough energy to start hanging them this weekend. I’m excited about the planks, but honestly have no idea how it will look with the tile. I’m hoping it matches and looks cool but there’s a part of me that is nervous I won’t like the wood stain at all…in which case the panels will most likely be painted white.

We’ve gotten several questions about putting wood in a humid bathroom. I’m not worried because the wood is sealed, and will be in an area that will get no direct water splashes. The moisture level in our bathroom is never excessive, as we have a vent fan that keeps it reasonable during showers, plus the tub is on the other side of a wall from the shower, so moisture that directly rises from the shower won’t immediately be hitting these planks. But, as is a good idea any time humidity fluctuations are possible, we’ll leave small gaps between the planks for expansion and contraction of the wood.

I’m thinking another weekend or two of work with the planks and painting and caulking around the tub the this renovation will be done! Can’t wait!

 

One thought on “Tub Time

  1. Lorraine Giffin

    My son-in-law’s threshold making skill is only one of many and I’m anxious to see it, stained gray. The tub looks great. That is an unusually large and rounded tub; it should be nice to soak in. Just a little blip in your water bill.

    Reply

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