Tag Archives: christmas

Kitchen Shelves and 100 Posts

Apparently this is my 100th post on the blog, which nicely coincides with us finally finishing the kitchen shelving. For all intents and purposes, I think this is good enough to call the kitchen DONE. DIY people seem to never quite “finish” a project because when you can do things yourself, there’s always something else you can add, or redo so it seems never ending at times.

We replaced the cabinet to the left of the sink with shelving, because when we were demo-ing the kitchen, and that cabinet came down, the room just opened up and seemed so light and airy.

Before:

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After:

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Nik immediately suggested putting shelves there, and I kind of agreed we could “try it,” fully thinking it wouldn’t happen. This is what happens when men are put in charge of renovations – they don’t think about the messy cups and plates that a solid cabinet door hides, but these are the thoughts women are plagued with. Fortunately, we received all new dinnerware and wine glasses and water glasses for our wedding, which can now be neatly displayed on our new shelves.

We wanted “bulkier” looking wood shelves, and unfortunately the hardware store only carries nicer wood planks up to 3/4″ thick. They looked a little underwhelming to us, so we wandered and came across stair treads, which are red oak, 1″ thick, and more than the 10″ deep that we wanted the shelves. They were a little pricey, at $27 a step, but the alternative was going to look for reclaimed wood at the Reuse Warehouse in Durham, which probably would’ve been comparable and would’ve taken up precious Saturday time.

We bought brackets off Etsy from Lithuania of all places, which were also pricey and came out to $155 with shipping for 9 brackets. But, they looked great and seemed strong enough to hold the shelves.

To get close to our floor stain color, we did a coat of special walnut and a coat of red chestnut Minwax stain. Then the shelves were sealed with 2 coats of water-based poly. Mounting the brackets into studs proved to be a bit challenging – especially the long shelf on the far wall, since there were no conveniently located studs for two of the brackets so we had to use drywall anchors. It took 2+ tries to find an anchor with appropriately sized screws for the brackets. But the shelves are up now, and here’s the finished product!

Far shelf (garage wall – we haven’t quite figured out what to put on this shelf yet, so as of now it’s extra bakeware and glasses and a decorative sign we got from Nik’s brother’s girlfriend for Christmas last year):

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And our left-of-sink cabinet (I think there’s too much stuff on this currently…but it doesn’t look as full in person. We might clear off some of the stuff if we can find space elsewhere).

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And to see how the shelves tie into the whole room, here are some further-away shots.

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We like how they turned out – and its exciting to have all those cups and plates up off the kitchen counter now!

In other news, we got our little tree up this weekend. There was some bickering about the slightly ridiculous star placement, and it seems as though my argument to leave it as is will win!

 

Christmas Tree Skirt

Even though we’re not spending Christmas Day together this year, we felt it was about time to graduate to a real tree to celebrate the season. Previously I had a small fake tree, and a very tiny treeĀ  skirt to go with it. We got our tree upright and lighted, and now we neededĀ  new tree skirt to complete the look. IMG_2200[1]The tree skirts left at Target were expensive and ugly so we made a trip to the fabric store and picked out a few red-and-gold tone fabrics, and some 1/2″ batting to fill it with. I decided I wanted to make a hexagon shape with alternating triangles of each fabric.

Then came the challenge…how many PhD scientists does it take to figure out basic geometry? Apparently it takes 2, and it also takes about 30 minutes to remember what geometry formula to apply. I knew the diameter of the hexagon, so I knew the length of each side of each equilateral triangle, but I needed to figure out the height to measure and cut the fabric. I remember sitting in 10th grade honors geometry, struggling to imagine when I’d ever need the Pythagorean Theorem ever again…turns out, it came in handy for my tree skirt! A squared plus B squared = C squared, and with that I had my dimensions. IMG_0027I pinned all the adjoining triangle edges together (except for one) and pinned down the peak of each triangle to leave room for the trunk.

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Then I sewed all the edges. I then cut out a solid piece as a backing, with a slit up to the middle, and a cut out area for the tree base as well. I pinned this to the sewed triangles inside out, and sewed all the way around, basically making a large letter C. I then turned it right side out, and cut some batting to shape and stuffed it in.

I still need to do the stitch up the final open side, but it looks nice enough for now to put under the tree! The fabric, batting, and thread cost about $20, which is cheaper than the ugly skirts at the store!

We also did a little decorating on our front porch, so I’ll leave you with this. Can’t believe Christmas is next week!

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